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What makes your brand approachable and relatable? Let’s Talk

Updated: Oct 16, 2023

A brand archetype represents a brand; its symbolic meanings, values, behaviors, and messages.

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One key aspect that sets brands apart is their uniqueness. Brands that successfully relate to people with similar values tend to have a unique message that resonates with their target audience.


This message can be delivered through advertising campaigns, social media presence, and even the products themselves.


Another important trait is Authenticity.


People often look for authenticity when they engage with a brand. Brands that are transparent about their values, actions, and operations tend to build trust with their audience.


They make an effort to connect with their customers on a personal level, and they listen to their feedback, concerns, and opinions.


A brand that prioritizes customer satisfaction is also more relatable and approachable.


A brand that values its customers and prioritizes their satisfaction is likely to build strong customer relationships that go beyond selling products; this builds loyalty and encourages repeat business.


Another way to make a brand more approachable and relatable is to encourage brand engagement. This could be done through social media marketing, competitions, events, and experiential marketing.

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Encouraging people to interact with your brand helps build familiarity and helps you form a personal connection with your customers, which is vital in building a highly engaged following.


Building an approachable and relatable brand requires a combination of uniqueness, authenticity, customer satisfaction, engagement, and a deep understanding of your target audience's values.


By prioritizing these aspects, brands can put themselves in the best position to connect with their customers on a more meaningful level.


As a persona, making it more instantly recognizable and relatable to target audiences.


The dictionary defines Archetype as a recurrent symbol or motif in literature, art, or mythology.


Brand archetypes offer businesses a personality that makes them appear approachable and relatable.


According to The Hero and The Outlaw, archetypes have existed as long as people have told stories.

They are evident in every compelling story: whether it is a play at your neighborhood theater or a blockbuster film – there are certain characters that emerge.


The most compelling stories have the most evident archetypes.


Star Wars is widely known for being hugely successful and was referenced as an example in the book for its distinct archetypes (Luke is the hero; Han Solo is the rebel).

Even though there hasn't been a recent film release, Star Wars remains a popular favorite among fans new and old.

Even though there hasn’t been a recent film release, Star Wars remains a popular favorite among fans new and old.


Kids of all ages from 2 to 52 find the world that was created by Star Wars creator George Lucas to be an infinitely fascinating world. 


Archetype-inspired birthday theme

If your special birthday girl or boy is a fan of these films this is the can’t-miss party theme to add to your perfect birthday party list.


There are many ways you can go that will bring the theme to light in a way that allows everyone to have fun.


You could have a classic Star Wars event with the original Episodes (IV, V, and VI) showing one after the other throughout the party.


This is perfect for an overnight or all-day sort of party.


It allows breaks in between the showings and plenty of time to incorporate some serious snack-making or pizza order without interfering with the DVDs being played in the background.


If you want to take things a step further you can also have your guests come dressed as their favorite Star Wars characters from all six films.


If you are truly adventurous you can do a back-to-back showing of all six films though this makes for a very long weekend sort of event.


Perfect if your birthday falls on around a 3-day weekend such as Labor Day or Memorial Day.

Otherwise, it’s a great idea but you may want to break it up into two years’ worth of celebrations.


If you are friends or your child’s friends are a creative bunch you can have a session where guests speculate and create tall tales.


What happens between Episodes III and IV? Or what happens to favorite characters after Episode VI?

If this isn’t enough activity and you want a little something to wear the kids (big or small) out, invite your guests to a Jedi training academy of sorts.


Set up an obstacle course for everyone to follow and a series of exercises similar to what Luke went through in The Empire Strikes Back.


The winner can get some Star Wars-themed awards for giggles and a little added entertainment.


This is a lot of fun and creates a sort of role-playing atmosphere for the party that can be a huge amount of fun.


Back to why you need an archetype.

Tsai prefaced archetypes by saying, “The archetypal patterns and images are found in every culture and in every period of human history. The fact humans do not have separate and individualized unconscious minds in an absolute sense.”

In many ways, they share a single “universal unconscious”, in which the human mind is rooted as a tree is rooted in the ground.


Through archetypal patterns and images, we represent the invisible realities of the human soul or psyche.

If this isn't enough activity and you want a little something to wear the kids (big or small) out you might want to invite your guests to a Jedi training academy of sorts.

Additionally, Tsai added, “These mythic worlds, built on archetypes, transcend mere communication.”


They are directly related to the unconscious images that every individual constructs during the course of life.


The deepest such images are those reflecting the most basic human experiences from infancy.


Since archetypes are common to humankind, in the sense that everyone has an idea of such concepts.

Such as; “father” and “mother”, “child”. “Lover”, “explorer”, “creator”, or “magician”.


Jung regarded the unconscious images derived from archetypal structures as the most fundamental perceptual symbols of human psychological existence.

People and brands also have their own archetypes.


Some may argue that archetypes are the mechanism with which we can identify with and ‘like’ certain celebrities that we may have never met.


The book The Hero and The Outlaw refers to Madonna.

Even though she has changed her identity multiple times, she has always been the outrageous outlaw.


If this isn't enough activity and you want a little something to wear the kids (big or small) out you might want to invite your guests to a Jedi training academy of sorts.

Prince was also an outlaw archetype.


On the day of his death, one radio deejay had a very impactful quote:


“He revolutionized pop music, and he was the first person to let us know that it was okay to be different.”


No wonder he was loved – he was a catalyst for teenagers to know they did not have to be like everyone else.


Implementing a strong archetype for your brand is about “becoming a consistent and enduring expression of meaning”.


Consistency is key.


An archetype has to be the long-lasting core of your brand.


One memorable example is Coca-Cola. The Innocent Archetype – have a Coke and a smile. The marketing campaign with people’s names evokes this same archetype.


Consumers love stories and when brands communicate the same emotions as stories.

If this isn't enough activity and you want a little something to wear the kids (big or small) out you might want to invite your guests to a Jedi training academy of sorts.

One explanation is that consumers are either “unconsciously reliving critical moments in their own lives or anticipating them”.


Brand archetypes are on the scale of the four basic human needs:


What are Brand Archetypes? A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages – as a persona, making it more instantly recognizable and relatable to target audiences. Brand archetypes offer businesses a personality that makes them approachable and relatable to people that share similar values

There are four basic needs that people are constantly moving between. Belonging versus independence, stability versus mastery.


Belonging: Be liked and part of a group; conform.

  1. Independence: Go your own way; do something others may not understand.

  2. Stability: The comfort of routine and staying with the tried and true.

  3. Mastery: Ambition; the exhilaration of accomplishment.

When consumers sacrifice on one end, there is a tendency in the psyche to seek balance.

This may be why when people get to a certain age and have such a sense of security, they purchase something out of character, i.e., a midlife crisis corvet purchase.

If this isn't enough activity and you want a little something to wear the kids (big or small) out you might want to invite your guests to a Jedi training academy of sorts.

Archetypes serve as a mediator between products and consumer motivation and provide meaning.


Buying shampoo for your newborn baby may seem like an insignificant purchase.


However, purchasing Johnson & Johnson shampoo makes you feel like a better mother, through the caregiver archetype.


The Caregiver archetype is the foundation of Johnson & Johnson’s marketing plan and they have been evoking it through its communications for years. Not only is this a compelling marketing principle, but it also produces financial results.


Mark and Pearson used Young & Rubican’s Brand Asset Valuator (extensive study of brands) to look at brands with strong archetypes and those with weak alignment.

Results found that the market value of those with a strong archetype rose 97% and economic value grew at a 66% greater rate than those without a strong brand archetype (Mark & Pearson, 2001).

According to Mark & Pearson (2001), “Identities that succeed at striking an essential human chord affect the most fundamental economic measures of success”(p. 30).

 

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